Tuesday, March 17, 2020

Free Essays on Lincolns Fate

On April 14, 1865 our sixteenth president was assassinated. President Abraham Lincoln was attending a comedy entitled â€Å"Our American Cousin† at Ford’s Theatre in Washington D.C. when â€Å"A shadowy figure stepped into the box, stretched out his arm, aimed a small derringer pistol at the back of Lincoln’s head, and pulled the trigger† (Freedman 123). Clara Harris, Henry Rathbone, And Mary Todd (Lincoln’s wife) all accompanied Lincoln in the state box that night; and they were all witnesses to this brutal crime (â€Å"Overview of Assassination†[Online]). The figure in the box that night was John Wilkes Booth. Booth, unscathed except for a broken leg, suffered after jumping eleven feet to the stage, escaped quickly before anyone could react to his performance (â€Å"Overview of Assassination†[Online]). It seems as if the events leading to this fateful day may have been premonitions of what was to come. The many changes of plans , Lincoln’s security, and the incapability to recognize the many clues left by Booth all contributed to the successful assassination of Abraham Lincoln. To begin with, there were many changes of the plan made that played right into the hands of the assassin. The President was supposed to be viewing a play at a distant hospital on March 17, 1865, but at the last minute decided to stay in Washington (â€Å"Overview of Assassination†[online]). Booth had originally decided to kidnap Lincoln, but in the situation above, he could never find the right opportunity. An already irate Booth became even more outraged by Lincoln’s speech on April 11, proposing that voting rights be given to blacks. Thus, Booth schemed and plotted to assassinate Lincoln instead (â€Å"Summary of Assassination†[online]). Then, prior to attending the play at Ford’s Theatre with Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant suddenly left town to visit his children(â€Å"Overview of Assassination†[online]). Once again, it was another change made ... Free Essays on Lincoln's Fate Free Essays on Lincoln's Fate On April 14, 1865 our sixteenth president was assassinated. President Abraham Lincoln was attending a comedy entitled â€Å"Our American Cousin† at Ford’s Theatre in Washington D.C. when â€Å"A shadowy figure stepped into the box, stretched out his arm, aimed a small derringer pistol at the back of Lincoln’s head, and pulled the trigger† (Freedman 123). Clara Harris, Henry Rathbone, And Mary Todd (Lincoln’s wife) all accompanied Lincoln in the state box that night; and they were all witnesses to this brutal crime (â€Å"Overview of Assassination†[Online]). The figure in the box that night was John Wilkes Booth. Booth, unscathed except for a broken leg, suffered after jumping eleven feet to the stage, escaped quickly before anyone could react to his performance (â€Å"Overview of Assassination†[Online]). It seems as if the events leading to this fateful day may have been premonitions of what was to come. The many changes of plans , Lincoln’s security, and the incapability to recognize the many clues left by Booth all contributed to the successful assassination of Abraham Lincoln. To begin with, there were many changes of the plan made that played right into the hands of the assassin. The President was supposed to be viewing a play at a distant hospital on March 17, 1865, but at the last minute decided to stay in Washington (â€Å"Overview of Assassination†[online]). Booth had originally decided to kidnap Lincoln, but in the situation above, he could never find the right opportunity. An already irate Booth became even more outraged by Lincoln’s speech on April 11, proposing that voting rights be given to blacks. Thus, Booth schemed and plotted to assassinate Lincoln instead (â€Å"Summary of Assassination†[online]). Then, prior to attending the play at Ford’s Theatre with Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant suddenly left town to visit his children(â€Å"Overview of Assassination†[online]). Once again, it was another change made ...

Sunday, March 1, 2020

Everybody Speaks Hamlet

Everybody Speaks Hamlet Everybody Speaks Hamlet Everybody Speaks Hamlet By Maeve Maddox Someone once said that every generation has its favorite Shakespeare play. Hamlet was a favorite with the Victorians. Macbeth enjoyed a great popularity in the first half of the 20th century; Othello in the second half. It seems to me that King Lear may be the play that will come to be associated with the early 21st century. Whatever the general trend, Hamlet is always near the top of Shakespeare favorites. As a result, quite apart from the famous To be or not to be and What a work is man soliloquies, many of the speeches, lines, and phrases have become embedded in our everyday speech. English speakers who have never read the play or seen it acted are likely to use one or more of the following expressions or some form or another: To thine own self be true Though this be madness, yet there is is method in t. The lady doth protest too much, methinks In my minds eye The plays the thing Frailty, thy name is woman! Neither a borrower nor a lender be to the manner born Alas, poor Yorick! Ay, theres the rub Brevity is the soul of wit Conscience does make cowards of us all Dog will have its day Get thee to a nunnery Hoist with his own petard in my heart of hearts It smells to heaven murder most foul Sweets to the sweet Not a mouse stirring something is rotten in the state of Denmark Want to improve your English in five minutes a day? Get a subscription and start receiving our writing tips and exercises daily! Keep learning! Browse the Expressions category, check our popular posts, or choose a related post below:Comma After i.e. and e.g.On Behalf Of vs. In Behalf OfThe Difference Between "Shade" and "Shadow"

Friday, February 14, 2020

Project Manegement, Final Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words

Project Manegement, Final - Assignment Example Risk Event Graph Risk cost High probability of cost to fix risk Risk occurring Low Beginning Project life cycle End Project is an undertaking that has a start and completion time (Kendrick, 2011). Therefore, generally risk is greater at the initial stage of the project implementation and tends to decline as the time progresses. The risk event graph enables project managers to estimate the chances of occurrence of risk at different times and decide on the resources they require for reducing the chances of risk (Dinsmore and, Cabanis-Brewin, 2011). This is usually essential at the initial stage of project implementation so that managers can mitigate the perceived risks and where possible eliminate it. The risk is usually high at the early phase of project implementation as a few expenses are sustained in mitigating the perceived risk (Wallace and Webber, 2011). However, as time progresses, the owner of the project injects more resources in mitigating consequences of the project hence r eduction in risk. Therefore, as more resources are injected in the project, the anticipated risk declines proportionately. This is because the perceived risk is due to the chances that the result of the project activities may yield undesired results (Dinsmore and, Cabanis-Brewin, 2011). Therefore, as the project is being implemented practically, the events become realistic without the anticipation of risk. This tends to lower the anticipated risk progressively towards the completion of the project (Kendrick, 2011). Risk event graph provides the project managers with a chance to estimate the risk associated with the project at the starting period so that they can take appropriate measure to reduce the anticipated risk before Types of risks Environmental risks: There is a probability of experiencing delays as a result of vagaries of weather hence casing unexpected delays in the completion of the project (Wallace and Webber, 2011). The workers are exposed to numerous dangers associated with injuries hence this may add cost to the general contractor (Dinsmore and, Cabanis-Brewin, 2011). This may result to inability to meet the client need at the agreed value of the houses. Personnel risk: The contractor is dealing with part time bookkeeper hence the bookkeeper may not be available during the project period (Kendrick, 2011). Since the contractor depends on hired subcontractors, there is a risk that during the contract period there may be some shortage of subcontractors hence the work may not b completed within the planned duration Construction risk: The suppliers of materials required for construction activities may fail to deliver the materials and equipment hence causing the contractor to delay in completing the work (Wallace and Webber, 2011). Market risk: The price of the construction materials and equipment may hike hence increasing the expenses of completing the project (Wallace and Webber, 2011). Political risk: The approval of the project may be delayed by the authority hence causing delay in commence and ending period of the project to fail to adhere to the set schedule (Kendrick, 2011). This may result to an imposition of penalty to the contractor as a result of breach of agreement. Design risk: The designers of the project may

Saturday, February 1, 2020

Community Empowerment and Motivation to Healthcare in an Acute Care Se Essay - 13

Community Empowerment and Motivation to Healthcare in an Acute Care Setting - Essay Example Motivation, however, involves triggering interest for application of developed potentials. Healthcare based empowerment and motivation within communities, therefore, involves facilitating self-reliance in improving health standards through prevention of diseases and infections without the direct involvement of care personnel. This aids self-care that, according to World Health Organization, is people’s potential, at either personal or communal level, to improve health standards, â€Å"prevent disease, and maintain health, and cope with illness and disability† without input from care personnel (Barlow, n.d., p. 1). Such empowerment and motivation are essential in the scope of acute care that majorly involves injuries and injury-related complications such as central nervous system and cerebrovascular accident complications, and â€Å"respiratory diseases,† â€Å"head injury,† â€Å"hemorrhage,† (Asha, 2013, p. 1). Community empowerment and motivation is an essential need that requires attention in acute care because of its preventive measure and its importance in providing emergency care in absence of care personnel. Its involved awareness and development of strengths for care initiatives ensure communities’ ability prevent the need for acute care and ability to meet rising health care needs. Consequently, the need ensures a healthy society regardless of the scarcity of health care facilities and personnel. It also means that community empowerment and motivation will relieve pressure on care facilities and promote efficiency in acute care services (See, 2007). My developed knowledge from the Doctor of Nursing Practice has diversified potentials to contribute to a nursing professional organization. My most significant contribution could be in the field of nursing research in which I could investigate aspects of self-care in an acute care setting. My research could explore people’s behavior and actions, and their possible effects on health.

Friday, January 24, 2020

To Kill a Mockingbird - The Powerful Character of Atticus Finch Essay

To Kill a Mockingbird - The Powerful Character of Atticus Finch In the beginning epigraph of To Kill a Mocking Bird, Harper Lee quotes a statement made by Charles Lamb: "Lawyers, I suppose, were children once." As told through the eyes of the rambunctious elementary school child, Scout Finch, we see not only how she and her brother's lives are affected by their community, also how they develop and mature under the watch of their father, lawyer Atticus Finch. As a wise role model to his town of Maycomb as well as his children, Atticus Finch becomes a prominently admirable character. As a father, lawyer, friend, and foe, Atticus Finch proves himself to be an honest, selfless, and courageous human being. Throughout many of the books main events, it is always clear that Atticus Finch holds true to his morals and beliefs despite all obstacles. After returning from reading to Mrs. Dubose, a morphine addict, with her brother, Jem, Scout asks her father, "Atticus, what exactly is a nigger-lover?" Having heard the term used many times referring to her father it is easy t...

Thursday, January 16, 2020

How Does the English Language Vary at Individual?

How does the English language vary at individual, societal and international levels? English has become the first `truly global language` (McCrum et al. , 2002, p. 9). As a result of advances in technology and transport, varieties of English have spread throughout the world. This internationalisation has been described by Shreeve as an `identified phenomenon` (1999, p. 1). English now underpins the lives and cultures of a broad spectrum of people, with one in four people in the world now fluent users of English (Crystal, 2002, p. 10).Language involves making meaning and individual identity. It has been defined by Emmit et al. as mediating `between self and society [†¦], a way of representing the world to ourselves and others` (2006, p. 17). There are strong links between how individuals use different varieties of English and the social implications of why they do so. According to Swann: `Language varieties are not simply linguistic phenomena. They carry important social meanings ` (2007, p. 11). Many social factors have affected the English language, leading to the numerous varieties that are recognised and used today.Variety can be seen in the way every individual uses the English language, the interaction between social groups and in the way different countries are utilising the language. The numerous dialects in use in the UK demonstrate the diverse nature of the English language. Dialects include variations in syntax, morphology, lexicon and phonology. It has been argued from a prescriptive perspective, by linguists such as Quirk and Greenbaum, that dialects are not true forms of English and that there needs to be a `common core of English` (Quirk, 1972; in Kachru et al, 2009, p. 513).This is the pure and stringent form known as Standard English, which is traditionally linked to educated society. Standardisation consists of `language determination, codification and stabilisation` (Trudgill, 1992, p. 117). It is a model to be consulted; a unified code to refer to. Standard English is a publicly recognised, fixed form, a mastery of which affords `social and educational advantages` (Eyres, 2007, p. 16). It was formed by a particular social group, the group with the highest degree of social capital (Bourdieu, 1986, pp. 241-258), power and prestige (Rhys, 2007).Rhys, however, perceives that Standard English is a `social dialect` (2007, p. 190) and argues that it is not superior to other dialects (Rhys, 2007). Labov states that: `all languages and dialects should be viewed as equal in terms of their ability to communicate` (1969; in Bell, 1997, p. 241). While a standard form of English can be seen as a social and communicative necessity useful for educational and international affairs, vernacular forms should not be discounted or regarded as inferior. Dialects represent a smaller locality and are therefore more personal.A relevant example is the use of dialects in regional BBC news broadcasting. While the national news is presented in S tandard English, a code with a particular grammar, pronunciation and register, the BBC’s regional programmes showcase a local identity that cannot be found in national broadcasting. Interviewees and `talking heads` often have strong regional accents and speak in the dialectal forms familiar to their viewers. The regional programmes are personal to their audience and emphasise the benefits of language variation. Dialects represent social bonds and form because of linguistic choice.The formation of dialects has been explained by Freeborn: `Different choices were made among the varied speech communities forming the speakers of English in the past. These choices are not conscious or deliberate, but pronunciation is always changing, and leads in time to changes in word form` (1993, p. 43). The English language has fragmented into pockets of dialect due to social difference and geography. This is a microcosm of how international languages form; distance causes change. Freeborn beli eves that `all dialects of a language are rule-governed systems` (1993, p. 0). All vernaculars are consistent, although they may not have the written grammar core (Quirk, 1972; in Kachru et al, 2009, p. 513) that Standard English can boast. There is great variation in dialect throughout the United Kingdom. In 1921, Sapir classified his notion of `dialect drift`. He explained how `language moves down time in a current of its own making. It has a drift` (1921; in Rhys, 2007, p. 2007). This idea relates to how language evolves; lexical and phonological elements are absorbed and new dialects are formed.However, while language is ever-changing, it is apparent in some cases that dialects are actually becoming more similar. This is defined by Rhys as dialect levelling (2007); when `regular contact between speakers of different dialects [causes them to] lose linguistic features of their dialect` (2007, p. 204). In the modern world this levelling process is a consequence of improved transpor t links, migration and the growth of media and broadcasting. The urbanisation of the UK means that rural areas are not as isolated from cities as they were when Sapir wrote of a dialect drift.Advances in technology and industry mean that the boundaries of dialect, known as `isoglosses` (Freeborn, 1993), are being broken down. People within dialect boundaries hear more varieties of English than they used to, so they naturally accommodate words and pronunciations into their speech. This process of change, however, occurs over a long period of time. Therefore, making sweeping statements about the future of dialects is difficult. Major changes to language and dialect will not be visible for decades.Different speech communities will always make different language choices (Freeborn, 1993), so there will always be regional variation. While language varies because of social groupings, there is also great variety within the speech patterns of an individual. Cheshire has found evidence that ` speakers continually reassess the context and adjust their speaking style accordingly` (1982, p. 125). People alter the way that they speak depending on the person or group that they are speaking to, the location that they are in, the type of conversation and the topic being discussed (Swann and Sinka, 2007).Bell is adamant that the `person or people you are speaking to will have the greatest effect on the type of language you will use` (1991; in Swann and Sinka, 2007, p. 230). He believes that the presence of another person or group causes people to change their linguistic code. This is known as the theory of `Audience Design` (Bell, 1997, p. 240). People feel the urge to fit in and adapt their language to meet their social and psychological needs. Audience Design can also be related to the idea of language performance (Hodge and Kress, 1988). People take on a variety of roles in their conversations due to a feeling of being atched and critiqued. Swann and Sinka perceive that `spea kers can be seen as relatively creative designers of language` (2007, p. 255). Language is a creative medium, in which the performer changes their approach depending on the recipient. The way that we utilise language and make choices suits our individual discursive requirements. People improvise with language as they try to adapt to new linguistic codes. Individuals feel the need to inhabit certain conversational personas and to adopt the linguistic features of their interlocutors. This phenomenon is an element of `Communication Accommodation Theory` (Giles, 1971).Giles and Powesland explain that accommodation can be `a device by the speaker to make himself better understood` (1997, p. 234) and that it can also be regarded as: `an attempt on the part of the speaker to modify or disguise his persona in order to make it more acceptable to the person addressed` (1997, p. 234). The concept of disguise is often associated with deception, but the linguistic adaption proposed by Accommodat ion Theory derives from constructive ideals. The ability to alter and weave linguistic codes in different situations is a socially integrative mechanism.Variety in an individual’s use of language exists to meet the expected communicative requirements of society. The English language is forever evolving and is gradually becoming a global language. This is due, in part, to globalisation. Contemporary globalisation is often associated with the ‘shrinking’ of time and space. This has affected international trade and industry and also the way that the English language is used at global level. Rapid developments in technological and digital communications have led to the description of the world as a global village (Hollis, 2008, p. 38). As the world becomes theoretically smaller, the development of English as a global language mirrors how our own standard form has developed in the UK. The world requires a stable and recognisable common code for effective global commun ication in sectors such as business, science, politics and commerce. It could be argued that both Standard English and a new international standard are impersonal varieties of English. These language forms are functional; a means to an end, whereas dialect and variety within a country could be seen as representative of a more personal identity.Crystal perceives that there are the `closest of links between language dominance and economic, technological and cultural power` (2003, p. 7). In the case of English developing into a global language the dominant force is the USA, which holds economic and political power. Due to the global position of the USA, countries which hold a lower international status are driven to adopt the English language. It appears that a universal, international standard is developing from an `urgent need to communicate at world level` (Crystal, 2002, p. 11).An example is Kenya, which holds English as a joint official language with Swahili. While English is `not necessarily welcomed`, it is learnt in Kenyan schools and `enjoys a high status` associated with social and economic success (Heardman, 2009, p. 20). The Kenyan adoption of the English language demonstrates a need for their country to function in an international realm. There are opposing views on the idea that English should become the first global language. Some see it as an encroachment on culture and diversity, while others regard it as imperative to communication in a modern world.In 1994, French legislation was passed in order to halt the advance of English into French language and culture. The `loi Toubon` (named after the Minister for Culture, Jacques Toubon), called for a ban on: `the use of foreign [English] in business or government communications, in broadcasting, and in advertising if â€Å"suitable equivalents† existed in French` (Murphy, 1997, p. 14). This law was a linguistic intervention, an attempt to prevent the fragmentation of the French language and to retain national identity. In this case, the `borrowings` (Dubois et al, 1973; in Swann, 2007, p. 4) that the French language had taken from English were becoming too frequent and were seen as being detrimental to France’s status as a historical and international power. The arrival of the internet, however, led French lawyer Thibaut Verbiest to enquire: `How can the Touban law be applied to internet sites created in languages other than French, that may be needed for the discharge of someone’s duties? ` (2005, in Swann, 2007, p. 37). As France and other countries have discovered, the adoption of the English language for global means is a modern, national necessity.The positive effects of English are apparent in other countries around the world. In India: `English acts as a levelling rather than divisive agent, smoothing out the intra-vernacular conflicts of a multi-lingual nation` (Chakrawarti, 2008, p. 39). While language variety in every country is vital to culture an d national identity, English as an international language offers a common form to be consulted and utilised. Evidence that a global language does not encroach on national identity can be seen in forthcoming changes to the English National Curriculum.Andalo reports that: `from 2010, it will be a compulsory part of the National Curriculum for children from the age of seven to fourteen to study a modern foreign language` (2007). The English government holds foreign languages in high regard and sees them as vital to a rounded education. The English language is a stabilising force, rather than a dominating one. The evolution of global English is linked to linguistic `stabilisation` (Trudgill, 1992, p. 117); a question of international need in a digital age, rather than a means of eliminating international language diversity and national identities.Language helps us to form ideas and process information on an individual level. It gives us our identity and allows us to make meaning within our social groups. Language will develop further as globalisation continues, as we strive to share meaning and communicate internationally. Crystal has suggested the idea of a `universal bidialectism` (2002, p. 294). His perception is that: `We may all need to be in control of two Englishes – the one which gives us our mutual or local identity, and the one which puts us in touch with the rest of the human race` (2002, p. 284).However, it could be suggested that we will be universally tridialectal. There is the descriptive regional variation within our national language, the prescribed standard form required for educational purposes and then the newer globalised form of English with which we communicate with the world. The evolution of the English language will derive from international necessity, but will not eliminate the fact that language always returns to the individual and their place in the world. List of References Andalo, D. (2007) All Primary Schools to Teach Foreign Languages by 2010. Online]. Available at: http://www. guardian. co. uk/education/2007/mar/12/schools. uk [Accessed: 2 November 2009] Bell, A. (1997) ‘Language Style as Audience Design’. pp. 240-257, in Coupland, N. and Jaworski, A. (eds) Sociolinguistics: a Reader and Coursebook. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan Bourdieu, P. (1986) ‘The Forms of Capital’. Handbook of Theory and Research for the Sociology of Education. 24 (1) pp. 241-258 Chakrawarti, P. (2008) ‘Decolonising and Globalising English Studies: The Case of English Textbooks in West-Bengal, India’.English in Education. 42 (1) pp. 37-53 Cheshire, J. (1982) Variation in an English Dialect: a Sociolinguistic Study. New York: Cambridge University Press Crystal, D. (2002) The English Language: A Guided Tour of the Language. 2nd edn. London: Penguin Books Ltd Crystal, D. (2003) English as a Global Language. 2nd edn. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press Emmit et al. (2006) Language and Lear ning: An Introduction to Teaching. 3rd edn. Oxford: Oxford University Press Eyres, I. (2007) English for Primary and Early Years: Developing Subject Knowledge. 2nd edn.London: SAGE Freeborn, D. (1993) Varieties of English: An Introduction to the Study of Language. 2nd edn. Basingstoke: Macmillan Giles, H. (1971) ‘Patterns of evaluation in reactions to R. P. , South Welsh and Somerset accented speech’. British Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology. 10 (1) pp. 280-281 Giles, H. and Powesland, P. (1997) Accomodation Theory pp. 232-239 in Coupland, N. and Jawowski, A. eds. (1997) Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan Heardman, K. (2009) An Introduction to Linguistics – The Study of Language. [PowerPoint Presentation].Faculty of Education: University of Plymouth Hodge, R. and Kress, G. (1988) Social Semiotics. Cambridge: Polity Press Hollis, N. (2008) The Global Brand: How to Create and Develop Lasting Brand Value in the World Market. Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan Kachr u, B. (2009) The Handbook of World Englishes. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell McCrum, R. et al. (2002) The Story of English. London: Faber and Faber Murphy, C. (1997) ‘The Spirit of Cotonou’. The Atlantic Monthly. 279 (1) pp. 14-16 Rhys, M. (2007) ‘Dialect Variation in English’. pp. 189-221, in Graddol, D. t al. (eds) Changing English. Abingdon: Routledge Shreeve, A. (1999) `The Power of English`. English in Education. 33 (3) pp. 1-5 Swann, J. (2007) ‘English Voices’, pp. 5-38, in Graddol, D. et al. (eds) Changing English. Abingdon: Routledge Trudgill, P. (1992) ‘Standard English: What it Isn’t’. pp. 117-128, Bex, T. and Watts, R. (eds) Standard English: The Widening Debate. London: Routledge Swann, J. and Sinka, I. (2007) ‘Style-Shifting, Code-Switching’. pp. 227-269, in Graddol, D. et al (eds) Changing English. Abingdon: Routledge

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

The Course of True Love Never Did Run Smooth in Pride and...

The course of true love never did run smooth in â€Å"Pride and Prejudice† The idiom â€Å"The course of true love never did run smooth† implies that the path to love is never simple and straight forward. The path to true love is filled with difficulties and obstacles from society, religion, or culture. In â€Å"Pride and Prejudice,† none exemplify this idiom more than the couples Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth and Mr. Bingley and Jane. The idea behind the proverb plays a central role in constructing the plot of the story as seen with the relationships, especially those of Bingley and Jane, and Darcy and Elizabeth. Jane Austen tells a fairy tale of how an attractive young lady, who is virtually penniless, meets with a handsome and rich gentleman, who is†¦show more content†¦Jane’s and Bingley’s relationship also depicts the idiom â€Å"the course of true love never did run smooth.† Jane Bennet and Charles Bingley meet and fall in love at a dance in Meryton. Their mutual attraction is evident to everyone, especially Mr. Darcy and Mr. Bingley’s sisters who disapprove of Jane’s social disadvantage. Jane and Mr. Bingley are considered the potential couple that will eventually marry. Elizabeth is happy and wants her sister to be happily married; therefore, she is happy at the thought of a marriage between Bingley and Jane. In the eyes of Elizabeth, this is would be the marriage of true affection. However, as the idiom indicates, one of the obstacles that makes the road to love for Jane and Bingley not smooth is the interference by his family. Bingley’s sisters try to convince Bingley not to marry Jane. If he is to marry, he should marry for money, connections, and pride (Schaefer 17). These are the same sentiments voiced by Darcy who is also concerned with social status. When Elizabeth joins Jane to keep her company at Netherfield, the Bingley sisters deride them for their country girls’ customs , lifestyle, and relations. Darcy optimistically indicates that these relations, â€Å"must very materially lessen their chance of marrying men of any consideration in the world† (Austen 37). The Bingley sisters try everything to prevent the relationship as they also interfere with the relationshipShow MoreRelatedLove in Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen1035 Words   |  5 PagesThe course of true love never did run smooth in â€Å"Pride and Prejudice† The idiom â€Å"The course of true love never did run smooth† implies that the path to love is never simple and straight forward. The path to true love is filled with difficulties and obstacles from society, religion, or culture. In â€Å"Pride and Prejudice,† none exemplify this idiom more than the couples Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth and Mr. Bingley and Jane. 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The different contexts in which these texts are written have all had a huge impact on the way in which love and marriageRead MorePride and Prejudice and A Midsummer Nights Dream1851 Words   |  8 PagesImpressions Revisited â€Å"The course of true love never did run smooth.† -William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Nights Dream ‘Pride and Prejudice first appeared between 1796 and 1797 under the title, ‘First Impressions. At first, the novel was written anonymously; however, after Jane Austens death, the novel became publicly known to people. The novel itself is a comedy of manners set in a quiet and charming rural England, between 1796 and 1813; to be exact, Pride and Prejudice is set amidst NapoleonicRead MoreEssay about Jane Austens Portrayal of Marriage in Pride and Prejudice1877 Words   |  8 PagesJane Austens Portrayal of Marriage in Pride and Prejudice Marriage plays an extremely important role in Jane Austens novel Pride and Prejudice. The novel begins with the sentence It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. This single sentence extremely significant in the fact that it is strongly connected with one of the main themes of the novel, and introduces a powerful irony that clashesRead MoreIdeas of Community in An Inspector Calls by J.B. Priestley Essay2524 Words   |  11 Pagesby playwrights and authors. Brecht- a German director, poet and playwright of late 19th and early 20th century was incredibly famous for his plays in which he introduced moral/ social and political issues (social division, racial prejudices etc) and encouraged the audience to think about what the moral and situations of the story were so that they could thereby learn through them. Priestely believed very strongly in such matters and these he showed through what he wroteRead MoreAsk the Dust by John Fante13686 Words   |  55 PagesCamilla Lopez, who becomes an obsession for him nearly as powerful as his career. Their mutual love and hatred for one another, and for themselves, provides an intensely dark comedy that exposes their inner conflicts, their racial bigotry and their low self-esteem as they struggle to survive in a contrived culture to which neither will ever really belong. Arturo loves Camilla; Camilla loves Sammy; Sammy loves nobody; and eventually Camilla disappears--but her presence in his life makes Arturo a wiserRead Moretheme of alienation n no where man by kamala markandeya23279 Words   |  94 Pagesfor peace and stability. They comment on the major events that occur in the play and provide the audience with the public reaction to the private struggles of the ruling family of Thebes. Minor Haemon The only surviving son of Creon. He is in love with Antigone, to whom he is engaged. He pleads in vain with his father for her life. He commits suicide in Antigone’s tomb after he discovers that Antigone has taken her own life. Ismene The elder sister of Antigone, who initially has reservationsRead MoreThe Ballad of the Sad Cafe46714 Words   |  187 Pagesgrotesque human triangle in a primitive Southern town. . . A young boy learning the difficult lessons of manhood. . . A fateful encounter with his native land and former love. . . These are parts of the world of Carson McCullers -- a world of the lost, the injured, the eternal strangers at life s feast. Here are brilliant revelations of love and longing, bitter heartbreak and occasional happiness -- tales that probe the very heart of our lives. CARSON McCULLERS (1917-1967) When she was only twenty-three